Pope

Pope Francis: “We didn’t come into this world to take it easy, but to leave a mark!”

Papal address at the World Youth Day Vigil, Krakow, Campus Misericordiae

Pope Francis: “We didn’t come into this world to take it easy, but to leave a mark!”

© Marcin Mazur/catholicnews.org

Following the public testimonies of three witnesses delivered to the Pope and all attending World Youth Day, Pope Francis made this address to the pilgrims:

It is good to be here with you at this Prayer Vigil!

At the end of this powerful and moving witness, Rand asked something of us.  She said: “I earnestly ask you to pray for my beloved country.”  Her story, involving war, grief and loss, ended with a request for prayers.  Is there a better way for us to begin our vigil than by praying?

We have come here from different parts of the world, from different continents, countries, languages, cultures and peoples.  Some of us are sons and daughters of nations that may be at odds and engaged in various conflicts or even open war.  Others of us come from countries that may be at “peace”, free of war and conflict, where most of the terrible things occurring in our world are simply a story on the evening news.  But think about it.  For us, here, today, coming from different parts of the world, the suffering and the wars that many young people experience are no longer anonymous, something we read about in the papers.  They have a name, they have a face, they have a story, they are close at hand. Today the war in Syria has caused pain and suffering for so many people, for so many young people like our good friend Rand, who has come here and asked us to pray for her beloved country.

Some situations seem distant until in some way we touch them.  We don’t appreciate certain things because we only see them on the screen of a cell phone or a computer.  But when we come into contact with life, with people’s lives, not just images on a screen, something powerful happens.  We feel the need to get involved.  To see that there are no more “forgotten cities”, to use Rand’s words, or brothers and sisters of ours “surrounded by death and killing”, completely helpless.  Dear friends, I ask that we join in prayer for the sufferings of all the victims of war and for the many families of beloved Syria and other parts of our world.  Once and for all, may we realize that nothing justifies shedding the blood of a brother or sister; that nothing is more precious than the person next to us.  In asking you to pray for this, I would also like to thank Natalia and Miguel for sharing their own battles and inner conflicts.  You told us about your struggles, and about how you succeeded in overcoming them.  Both of you are a living sign of what God’s mercy wants to accomplish in us.

This is no time for denouncing anyone or fighting.  We do not want to tear down.  We have no desire to conquer hatred with more hatred, violence with more violence, terror with more terror.  We are here today because the Lord has called us together.  Our response to a world at war has a name: its name is fraternity, its name is brotherhood, its name is communion, its name is family.  We celebrate the fact that coming from different cultures, we have come together to pray. Let our best word, our best argument, be our unity in prayer.  Let us take a moment of silence and pray.  Let us place before the Lord these testimonies of our friends, and let us identify with those for whom “the family is a meaningless concept, the home only a place to sleep and eat”, and with those who live with the fear that their mistakes and sins have made them outcasts.  Let us also place before the Lord your own “battles”, the interior struggles that each of your carries in his or her heart.

SILENCE

As we were praying, I thought of the Apostles on the day of Pentecost.  Picturing them can help us come to appreciate all that God dreams of accomplishing in our lives, in us and with us.  That day, the disciples were together behind locked doors, out of fear.  They felt threatened, surrounded by an atmosphere of persecution that had cornered them in a little room and left them silent and paralyzed.  Fear had taken hold of them.  Then, in that situation, something spectacular, something grandiose, occurred.  The Holy Spirit and tongues as of fire came to rest upon each of them, propelling them towards an undreamt-of adventure.

We have heard three testimonies.  Our hearts were touched by their stories, their lives.  We have seen how, like the disciples, they experienced similar moments, living through times of great fear, when it seemed like everything was falling apart.  The fear and anguish born of knowing that leaving home might mean never again seeing their loved ones, the fear of not feeling appreciated or loved, the fear of having no choices.  They shared with us the same experience the disciples had; they felt the kind of fear that only leads to one thing: the feeling of being closed in on oneself, trapped.  Once we feel that way, our fear starts to fester and is inevitably joined by its “twin sister”, paralysis: the feeling of being paralyzed. Thinking that in this world, in our cities and our communities, there is no longer any room to grow, to dream, to create, to gaze at new horizons – in a word to live – is one of the worst things that can happen to us in life.  When we are paralyzed, we miss the magic of encountering others, making friends, sharing dreams, walking at the side of others.

But in life there is another, even more dangerous, kind of paralysis.  It is not easy to put our finger on it.  I like to describe it as the paralysis that comes from confusing happiness with a sofa.  In other words, to think that in order to be happy all we need is a good sofa.  A sofa that makes us feel comfortable, calm, safe.  A sofa like one of those we have nowadays with a built-in massage unit to put us to sleep.  A sofa that promises us hours of comfort so we can escape to the world of videogames and spend all kinds of time in front of a computer screen.  A sofa that keeps us safe from any kind of pain and fear.  A sofa that allows us to stay home without needing to work at, or worry about, anything.  “Sofa-happiness”!  That is probably the most harmful and insidious form of paralysis, since little by little, without even realizing it, we start to nod off, to grow drowsy and dull while others – perhaps more alert than we are, but not necessarily better – decide our future for us.  For many people in fact, it is much easier and better to have drowsy and dull kids who confuse happiness with a sofa.  For many people, that is more convenient than having young people who are alert and searching, trying to respond to God’s dream and to all the restlessness present in the human heart.

The truth, though, is something else.  Dear young people, we didn’t come into this work to “vegetate”, to take it easy, to make our lives a comfortable sofa to fall asleep on.  No, we came for another reason: to leave a mark.  It is very sad to pass through life without leaving a mark.  But when we opt for ease and convenience, for confusing happiness with consumption, then we end up paying a high price indeed: we lose our freedom.

This is itself a great form of paralysis, whenever we start thinking that happiness is the same as comfort and convenience, that being happy means going through life asleep or on tranquilizers, that the only way to be happy is to live in a haze. Certainly, drugs are bad, but there are plenty of other socially acceptable drugs, that can end up enslaving us just the same.  One way or the other, they rob us of our greatest treasure: our freedom.