More from Aleteia

Not Prepared to Donate?

Here are 5 ways you can still help Aleteia:

  1. Pray for our team and the success of our mission
  2. Talk about Aleteia in your parish
  3. Share Aleteia content with friends and family
  4. Turn off your ad blockers when you visit
  5. Subscribe to our free newsletter and read us daily
Thank you!
Team Aleteia

Subscribe

Aleteia

Feminist Activists Protest at Notre Dame Cathedral. Guess Who Gets Punished?

KENZO TRIBOUILLARD


Numéro de document



12102





Accès



Ouvert





social_id



FRANCE-POLITICS-FEME

N-DEMO





Original Filename



000_Par7317833.jpg





Language



English





Author



Jeffrey Bruno





Age restriction



All ages may watch





Keywords



HORIZONTAL,

POLITICS, WOMAN,

DEMONSTRATOR,

DEMONSTRATION,

PARADE, STREET,

STRIPPED TO THE

WAIST, FLOWER, LONG

HAIR, FEMINIST, BARE

BREASTS, RAISED

HAND, SLOGAN,

POLITICAL ACTIVIST,

FEMINIST MOVEMENT,

FEMINISM, HAND IN

HAND, FEMEN





Country



FRANCE





Creation Date



18 septembre 12





Credits



KENZO TRIBOUILLARD





Iconographer



Jeffrey Bruno





Photo research date



26 mars 13





Photographer's name



KENZO TRIBOUILLARD




Share

Topless women made a scene in "celebration" of Pope Benedict's retirement.

A Paris court on Wednesday threw out a legal complaint against nine activists who bared their breasts in a protest at Notre Dame Cathedral but ruled that three security guards who restrained the women were too violent. 

On February 12, 2013, nine topless members of the feminist protest group “Femen” burst into Notre Dame to "celebrate" Pope Benedict XVI’s resignation. They also wanted to express anger at the Church’s opposition to same-sex "marriage," according to the Associated Press. The women vandalized one of the bells on display in the cathedral.

As three security guards tried to remove the struggling Femen protestors, one of the women had her hair pulled and a tooth broken.

Prosecutors requested a fine of 1,500 euros against each of the Femen agitators. However, at a hearing on July 9, the criminal court acquitted the Femen, but kept in place the misdemeanor fines of 250, 300, and 500 euros against the three guards. (This way, the guards are sure to understand that the next time the cathedral is taken over by activists screaming and hitting at whatever falls to hand, they should not lift a finger for fear of having to pay a steep bill.)

In its ruling this week, the court found there was insufficient evidence of any material damage by the activists. 

Wearing flower garlands in their hair, the activists hailed the verdict and vowed to press on with protests against religious institutions.

Prosecutors and Notre Dame have 10 days to decide whether to seek an appeal. The Paris prosecutor has decided to appeal.

Welcome to the brave new world—one in which the Femen can perform the most odious provocations in the cathedral of Paris with impunity and three unfortunate security guards are charged with "violence" and fined.

The verdict of this first trial of the Femen in France leaves a bitter taste. Waving the banner of secularism and shouting "crime of blasphemy," the Femen skillfully exploited the total confusion that reigns today in France in regard to the notion of "laicité” (secularism).

This article originally appeared in Aleteia’s French edition. The Associated Press contributed to this article.
 

Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.
Aleteia offers you this space to comment on articles. This space should always reflect Aleteia values.
[See Comment Policy]
Readers like you contribute to Aleteia's Mission.

Since our inception in 2012, Aleteia’s readership has grown rapidly worldwide. Our team is committed to a mission of providing articles that enrich, inspire and inform a Catholic life. That's why we want our articles to be freely accessible to everyone, but we need your help to do that. Quality journalism has a cost (more than selling ads on Aleteia can cover). That's why readers like you make a major difference by donating as little as $3 a month.