Aleteia logoAleteia logo
Aleteia
Monday 18 January |
Saint of the Day: Bl. Maria Teresa Fasce
home iconNews
line break icon

Prepping for 2016, Jindal Leads GOP Pack to Flay Common Core

Gage Skidmore

Mark Stricherz - published on 02/10/15

Louisiana governor contrasts education policies to those of Jeb Bush, another likely presidential candidate.

WASHINGTON — Governor Bobby Jindal sought to raise his political profile as a leader of decentralized school reform Monday. Hopscotching around the nation’s capital, the Louisiana Republican drew an implicit contrast with his education policies to those of Jeb Bush, another likely GOP presidential candidate.

"It boils down to this question: Do you want moms—and essentially it’s moms who make this decisionto make these decisions? Or do you think bureaucrats in D.C. or Baton Rouge know best?" Jindal said at a daylong forum that Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina hosted at the Hart Senate Office Building.

Earlier in the day, Jindal attacked the education standards movement known as Common Core. "If I were to run, it would be not only on this issue, and I’m all for getting rid of Common Core, but for block grants to the states and tying funding to students," Jindal said at a breakfast briefing The Christian Science Monitor hosted Monday morning.

In the afternoon, at a lunch briefing, the conservative think the Heritage Foundation hosted Jindal called for a "bottom-up approach that trusts parents." Also, he released details of his education proposals in a 42-page white paper, "K-12 Education Reform: A Roadmap." The blueprint called for eliminating teacher tenure, withdrawal from Common Core, and greater school choice.

Reporters asked Jindal if he would run for president in 2016. At both the Christian Science Monitor and Senate events, Jindal did not deny interest and repeated that he thinks it is more important “what a president does in office” than who is in office.

Jindal was elected to the first of two four-year terms as governor in 2008. After Obama won his first term in office, Jindal was seen by party leaders as a politician who could give the Republican Party a fresh image. A first-generation Indian American, the 43-year-old Jindal was a young, non-white face in a party identified with older whites. He delivered the Republican Party’s rebuttal to the State of the Union in 2009. Although pundits criticized his performance as inartful, Jindal has recaptured interest from close political observers by talking about a White House bid.

Jindal’s opposition to Common Core contrasts with Jeb Bush’s support for the state-by-state standards. Although Bush did not carry out the K-12 guidelines as governor of Florida from 2003 to 2011, he promoted them through a non-profit, Foundation for Excellence in Education. “The net result after 10 years of struggle, and believe me, the tire marks are on my forehead for this reason, is that we moved the needle in student learning,” Bush said at the Detroit Economic Club on Feb. 4.

As both governor of Texas and president, George W. Bush, Jeb’s older brother, helped lead the drive for national standards for elementary and secondary education. Congress approved the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. States were given federal funding in exchange for raising student test scores.

The law was designed to help poor states such as Louisiana. And Jindal, too, supported Common Core.  But last June, he signed an executive order to withdraw Louisiana from the standards. Jindal’s about-face attracted media attention. Yet Louisiana has ranked at the bottom on student achievement with and without the standards. More than two-thirds of the state’s 4th and 8th graders failed to reach proficiency in 2013, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

A handful of other states have withdrawn from the standards too. But Jindal is the first likely Republican presidential candidate to make opposition to the two-decade old accountability program a centerpiece of his bid for the White House. His stand runs the risk of alienating general election voters. As recently as 1996,

  • 1
  • 2
Tags:
EducationPolitics
Support Aleteia!

If you’re reading this article, it’s thanks to the generosity of people like you, who have made Aleteia possible.

Here are some numbers:

  • 20 million users around the world read Aleteia.org every month
  • Aleteia is published every day in eight languages: English, French, Arabic, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, and Slovenian
  • Each month, readers view more than 50 million pages
  • Nearly 4 million people follow Aleteia on social media
  • Each month, we publish 2,450 articles and around 40 videos
  • We have 60 full time staff and approximately 400 collaborators (writers, translators, photographers, etc.)

As you can imagine, these numbers represent a lot of work. We need you.

Support Aleteia with as little as $1. It only takes a minute. Thank you!

Daily prayer
And today we celebrate...




Top 10
DAD, HOW DO I?
Cerith Gardiner
Meet the dad who's teaching basic skills on Y...
LUXOR FILM FESTIVAL
Zoe Romanowsky
20-year-old filmmaker wins award for powerful...
DAD, HOW DO I?
Cerith Gardiner
Meet the dad who's teaching basic skills on Y...
SAINT RITA CASCIA
Bret Thoman, OFS
Traces of miracles remain at the birthplace o...
Fr. Patrick Briscoe, OP
Reasons Catholics should read the Bible
POPE JOHN PAUL II
Philip Kosloski
St. John Paul II's formula for defeating evil...
Philip Kosloski
What is the Holy Cloak of St. Joseph?
See More
Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.