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Tuesday 18 May |
Saint of the Day: St. John I
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7 Ways to Have A Really Good Lent

SPENCER PLATT / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFP

Sam Guzman - published on 02/17/15

A good Lent takes focus and discipline, and it can easily be wasted

Lent is a season of penance and ascetical warfare. The enemy is concupiscence, the world, and the devil. The goal is pure hearts so that we can joyfully celebrate the resurrection of our Lord at Easter, the greatest feast of the liturgical year. In a way, Lent should be a microcosm of our entire struggle on earth, just as the Paschal feast of Easter is a microcosm of our heavenly triumph in Christ. Yet, a good Lent takes focus and discipline, and it can easily be wasted.

In my own experience, I often begin the lenten season with the best of intentions. I imagine myself going into full monk mode, fasting and praying as ardently as one of the monastic fathers in the desert. And maybe for the first week I succeed through sheer strength of will. Then, just when I am feeling good about myself, everything falls apart and I come face to face with my own weakness.

We’ve all been there at some point, and so today I’d like to share seven practical ways to have a good Lent.

1. Have a plan – The fastest way to ruin Lent is to have good intentions but no plan. Be specific. “I’m going to pray more,” isn’t good enough. Download this helpful worksheet to get started. Once you’ve determined what you are going to do, stick to it every single day.

One word of advice: Make it doable. Often, we are overly ambitious and commit to way too much. When we fail in our lenten goals, we grow discouraged and give up completely. This is a victory for the devil. Make your commitments modest and practical, and your Lent will be the better for it.

2. Read a good book – The saints are constantly exhorting us to read good spiritual books, and there is no better time to begin this practice than during Lent. Reading Scripture or the writings of the saints is a great place to start. Here are some suggestions for Lenten reading:

Meditations for Lent by Jacques-Benigne Bossuet

The Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis

Divine Intimacy by Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalene

Humility of Heart by Fr. Cajetan Mary da Bergamo

True Devotion to Mary by St. Louis de Montfort

The Spiritual Combat by Dom Lorenzo Scupoli

A Lenten Journey with Jesus and St. Paul of the Cross by Fr. Victor Hoaglund

Happy Are You Poor by Fr. Thomas Dubay

Letter to Friends of the Cross by St. Louis de Montfort

Love of Eternal Wisdom by St. Louis de Montfort

3. Examine yourself – Lent is an excellent time to take an inventory of the state of your soul. What are your predominant faults? Do you have any hidden idols in your life? What is keeping you from following the will of God with all your heart? Use a thorough examination of conscience to help you assess your spiritual health.

Remember, Lent is not ultimately about giving up sweets or other things we enjoy, it is first and foremost about repentance, which means giving up up sin and returning to God, our loving Father. While taking inventory of your sins may be painful, it is a healthy pain that restores the soul.

4. Confess your sins – After examining your conscience, the logical next step is to go to confession. Normally, it can be hard to find a parish with confession readily available (thirty minutes on a Saturday isn’t enough!), but the good news is, many parishes have increased confession times during Lent, so it’s a great time to go.

Before receiving the sacrament of penance, though, remember the five requirements for a good confession: 1) Examination of conscience 2) True contrition for having offended God 3) Firm resolution to sin no more 4) Clear confession (don’t hold any sins back) 5) Penance for the sins you have committed

5. Pray – Let’s face it, we can all 

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CatholicismLent
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