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Good Samaritans Rescue Disabled D.C. Man from Oncoming Subway Train

Enzo-Figueres-CC
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Two men jumped onto tracks in daring feat

Two men in Washington, D.C., rescued a disabled man who had fallen onto the tracks of a subway station. According to a local NBC affiliate,
 

Washington, D.C., Metro riders rushed to the rescue of a man who drove his motorized wheelchair onto the tracks at the U Street station Tuesday afternoon.

Two men jumped down after him and hoisted him back up to the platform in about 30 seconds as other riders also went to the edge of the platform to help. They also retrieved the wheelchair.

The closest train was three stations away, but the third rail was hot.

While Metro acknowledged the heroics of the good Samaritans, they reminded that it’s best to wait for the station manager to cut power to the third rail.

Emergency workers said the man was conscious and breathing with some cuts to his face.

“He’s a regular down here as well,” said an employee of the & Pizza by the 13th Street entrance. “We see him all the time. He comes to & Pizza. He’s a good guy so I’m glad they rescued him, took care of him.”

The Good Samaritans performed their act at a time when most Americans don’t trust the federal government in Washington to do what’s right, according to Gallup.

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