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5 Religious who look (and act) like Jedi Knights

LUKE SKYWALKER,SAINT FRANCIS
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Luke Skywalker is obviously a Franciscan (but could also be a Carmelite or a Jesuit).

Knights Templar

KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
Public Domain

Referring to a now disbanded religious order, in the early drafts of the Star Wars story George Lucas wrote about a 16-year-old who enters the “Intersystems Academy to train as a potential Jedi-Templar.” Of note is the use of the word “Jedi-Templar,” in a subtle nod to the Catholic religious military order known as the “Knights Templar.” The word Templar was soon abandoned, but Lucas did not drop the idea entirely, referring to them throughout his films as “Jedi Knights.”

Writer Terrance MacMullan explains how the Knights Templar “were esteemed above other knights for their austerity, devotion, and moral purity. Like the Jedi, they practiced individual poverty within a military-monastic order that commanded great material resources.” Even the Jedi’s garb is reminiscent of the robes worn by the “Christian warrior-monks who took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.”

Unfortunately, rumors grew about secret rituals and heretical teachings being taught to new recruits of the Knights Templar, and King Philip IV of France took advantage of the situation to confiscate the order’s riches. It’s possible that this episode also influenced Lucas, as it was pointed out, “Much like the Great Jedi Purge ordered by Chancellor Palpatine in ‘Revenge of the Sith,’ France’s King Philip IV annihilated the Knights Templar after arresting hundreds of them on October 13, 1307, and subsequently torturing and executing them for heresy.”

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