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we pronounce it \ ă-lә-`tay-uh \
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Launched with the blessing and encouragement of the Vatican’s Dicastery for Communication, Aleteia provides a new kind of journalism, with a well-tempered Catholic perspective on today’s news, culture, inspiring stories and evangelization.
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Meet Colt, the dog that helps its owner during epileptic seizures (VIDEO)

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Woman’s best friend, indeed.

A few years ago, Janaye Kearns, a young woman from Colorado Springs, suffered a brain injury. From that moment on, any other injuries, however small, can have terrible consequences. She now suffers from seizures and her probabilities of having an accident are quite high.

But fortunately, Colt is by her side: a beautiful cinnamon-colored Weimaraner-Labrador who’s been gradually learning how to help her in her everyday life.

Thanks to a video Kearns herself uploaded to her YouTube channel, we can see Colt in action: “This is how Colt trains to keep my head safe during seizures. He always looks back to make sure I am safe and keeps trying till I am. I am so blessed to have him.”

Now, Colt is not only helping Kearns in case of a seizure. He is instrumental in other aspects of her quotidian life. He’s in charge of some of the housework, some shopping, and also finds the time to play and enjoy nice walks. “I can lead an almost normal life thanks to my dog,” Kearns affirms.

Of course, Colt, special as he is, is not the only dog out there giving this kind of services. Several foundations, in different countries, are training dogs for medical assistance purposes. Dogs can detect rises and falls of glucose (diabetes), crisis of sensory disconnection (epilepsy), and press emergency buttons notifying relatives in case of seizures. There are also dogs trained to help disabled people in wheelchairs. These dogs not only liven up these people’s lives in a practical way, but they are also excellent, cherishing, caring companions.

This article was originally published in the Spanish Edition of Aleteia. Its contents have been translated and adapted for an English speaking audience. 

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