Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here
Subscribe to Aleteia's free newsletter: Goodness. Beauty. Truth. No yelling.
Sign me up!

Not Prepared to Donate?

Here are 5 ways you can still help Aleteia:

  1. Pray for our team and the success of our mission
  2. Talk about Aleteia in your parish
  3. Share Aleteia content with friends and family
  4. Turn off your ad blockers when you visit
  5. Subscribe to our free newsletter and read us daily
Thank you!
Team Aleteia

Subscribe

Aleteia

Here’s what the 7 deadly sins look like in the modern world

SEVEN DEADLY SINS
Share

Three artists provide a contemporary way to examine our consciences.

In the 6th century, a list of the seven deadly sins was officially outlined by Pope Gregory the Great, who reduced the original list of eight written by a respected monk named Evagrius the Solitary. The list was changed only slightly again in the 17th century, with the final list, which we still refer to today, composed of lust, avarice, gluttony, sloth, anger, greed, and pride.

Though some might consider this an old and outdated way of understanding the faults of humanity, some modern artists chose to use their imaginations to make the deadly sins more recognizable to our modern “plugged-in” world. More than drawings, their incarnations of these ancient sins can provide an insightful examination of conscience for how we engage with modern technology.

Here are the works of three artists who visualized the seven deadly sins in a contemporary way:

“7 Sins in the Digital World” by Ari Paul

You can see more here.

2. Shawn Coss

You can see more of Shawn Coss’ series here.

Shawn Coss is also known for his renderings that depict various mental illnesses, which you can see here.

3. “My Minimalistic Representation of the Se7en Deadly Sins” by Abha Patil

You can see more here.

 

Read more: Answer to the Tuesday Test: Do You Know the Seven Deadly Sins?

Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.
Aleteia offers you this space to comment on articles. This space should always reflect Aleteia values.
[See Comment Policy]
Readers like you contribute to Aleteia's Mission.

Since our inception in 2012, Aleteia’s readership has grown rapidly worldwide. Our team is committed to a mission of providing articles that enrich, inspire and inform a Catholic life. That's why we want our articles to be freely accessible to everyone, but we need your help to do that. Quality journalism has a cost (more than selling ads on Aleteia can cover). That's why readers like you make a major difference by donating as little as $3 a month.