Not Prepared to Donate?

Here are 5 ways you can still help Aleteia:

  1. Pray for our team and the success of our mission
  2. Talk about Aleteia in your parish
  3. Share Aleteia content with friends and family
  4. Turn off your ad blockers when you visit
  5. Subscribe to our free newsletter and read us daily
Thank you!
Team Aleteia

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Aleteia

Filipino Catholics accompany Muslims in Ramadan fast

© AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez
PHILIPPINES, Tolosa/Tacloban : TOPSHOTS

Survivors of Super Typhoon Haiyan march during a religious procession in Tolosa on the eastern Philippine island of Leyte on November 18, 2013 over one week after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the area. The United Nations estimates that 13 million people were affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan with around 1.9 million losing their homes. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez
Share this article for a Chance to Win a Pilgrimage to Rome
Share
Your Entries
Total Entries

The Church in the war-torn city of Marawi called on Catholics to begin the month as Muslims do -- with prayer, fasting, and serving the poor.

In a gesture of solidarity, Filipino Catholics joined Muslims in the war-torn city of Marawi to kick off the start of Ramadan this week.

About a thousand Christians and Muslims participated in the annual “Duyog Ramadan” celebration which was spearheaded by the Catholic prelature in Marawi, according to a report in UCANews.

Since 1979 the Church, has encouraged Christian families to “accompany” Muslim residents of the city, by fasting, praying, and serving the poor.

This year’s event comes at a very difficult time for both Muslims and Christians in Marawi. A five-month conflict between pro-Islamic State terrorists and government forces that left destruction in its wake and displaced 400,000 Muslims and Christians from Marawi, the only majority-Muslim city in the Philippines.

“After the destruction of the city, Catholics need to show more solidarity with our Muslim brothers and sisters,” Father Gary Alvarado, head of the group Duyog Marawi, told UCANews.

Reynaldo Barnido, executive secretary of the group, said that the event helps reinforce the bond between followers of the two religions.

“This year’s Ramadan is a celebration of victory against individuals and groups who intended to destroy the unity we’re forging between Christians and Muslims,” Barnido. told UCANEWS.

Sultan Abdul Hamidullah Atar of Marawi hailed fasting as a way to “the transformation of the inner self of every person.”

“Let Ramadan be our guide towards reconciliation and peace,” the Muslim leader told UCANews.

Six months after Marawi was liberated, displaced Christians have been slow to return to a city where so much has been destroyed, according to an article at ReliefWeb.

Barnido told ReliefWeb that until last year Muslims had co-exited peacefully with Christians in the city. The 84-year old St. Mary’s Cathedral was among the buildings destroyed by military bombs during the city’s liberation.

Catholic bishops who visited the heavily damaged cathedral in March determined that it would have to be demolished.

“One of the bishops knelt on the ground. It was very sad to see what happened to the church,” Barnido said.

 

Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.
Aleteia offers you this space to comment on articles. This space should always reflect Aleteia values.
[See Comment Policy]

Select how you would like to share.

Share
*Credit for shared articles will only be given once the recipient of your shared article clicks on the unique referral URL.
Click here for more information about Aleteia's Pilgrimage to Rome Sweepstakes.

To participate in the sweepstakes, you must accept the following conditions:


Read the terms and conditions