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The Church of San Francisco (Quito, Ecuador) in all its splendor

San Francisco (Quito, Ecuador)

AFP PHOTO / RODRIGO BUENDIA

Pablo Cesio - published on 08/15/18

Striking images of the first day of the Festival of Light show a historic church lit up in a very special way for the first time.

These were 10 minutes that created memories for a lifetime. The Church of San Francisco, which for the first time was illuminated at the Fiesta de la Luz, captivated the attention of all who gazed intently at the projected images on the opening day of the event.

Using a technique called “mapping,” it was possible to project on the façade of the building a collection of works named “Heritage” by the French artist Laurent Langlois, which inckuded “images of the volcanoes that surround the city, as well as architectural jewels and pre-Columbian symbols,” says the AFP news agency.

This artistic rendering includes a reference to a famous local legend “that tells of a pact that an indigenous man by the name of Cantuña made with the devil in order to have the construction of the church finished on time,” the news agency add.

The Church of San Francisco is truly an architectural jewel for the entire continent. It dates back to the 16th century and is located in the historic center of the city of Quito, Ecuador. In it, besides the many secret nooks and crannies one can find and explore with amazement, one can also enjoy beautiful works of colonial art, especially those associated with the famous Quito School.

Thousands of people flooded the Historic Center

The first day of the Festival of Light broke its attendance record. According to data provided by Ecuador’s Ministry of Homeland Security, collected by the Office of the Mayor of Quito, an estimated 540,000 people walked the streets of the Historic Center for the opening of the event.

Both domestic and foreign tourists mingled at the event, which this year has 19 different art-illumination exhibits. The festival is also a great opportunity to sample and enjoy various indigenous foods and traditional sweets, and to admire local artisan crafts.

The Festival of Light was held for the third consecutive year between August 8 and 12. Beyond its festive appeal, the main objective of this annual festival is to help revitalize awareness of the patrimony, rich cultural heritage, and artistic significance of a city that celebrates 40 years of having been declared a World Heritage Site.

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