Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here
Start your mornings with the good, the beautiful, the true... Subscribe to Aleteia's free newsletter!
Sign me up!

Not Prepared to Donate?

Here are 5 ways you can still help Aleteia:

  1. Pray for our team and the success of our mission
  2. Talk about Aleteia in your parish
  3. Share Aleteia content with friends and family
  4. Turn off your ad blockers when you visit
  5. Subscribe to our free newsletter and read us daily
Thank you!
Team Aleteia

Subscribe

Aleteia

Meditate on the light of Christ during Advent

CHRISTMAS FAITH
Shutterstock
Share

Ask yourself, “What part of my life most needs the light of Jesus?”

There are many spiritual themes to meditate on during the season of Advent, but one that is especially fruitful is the theme of light and darkness.

In the Northern hemisphere the birth of Jesus falls during the darkest time of the year, but immediately afterwards, the light begins to grow and the days get longer.

Jesus is the “light of the world” and his coming as a “light” is important.

Sin is often equated to “darkness” and so its important to allow Jesus, “the light,” to penetrate every room in our heart, bringing with it a healing touch.

In the book, Meditations for Advent, the author explains how we should ask the Infant Jesus to shine his light within our hearts.

Let us [pray] to the Infant Jesus to enlighten us in that particular way in which we most need light….we too often, by our own fault, relapse into blindness more or less intense. Sometimes we do not wish to see the sin we should forsake, or the virtue we should practice.

Ask yourself during Advent, “What part of my life most needs the light of Jesus?”

Furthermore, if we allow Jesus’ light to shine brightly within us, we are more likely to see our faults and try to correct them.

There are souls in whom the light of God shines so brightly, that they cannot commit the shadow of an imperfection without perceiving it immediately; there are souls in whom that light shines so resplendently, that they see even the shadow of an imperfect motive in the best action they perform. Why should we not be thus favored? It is not because the light is unwilling to come, but because we are unwilling to receive it. 

Jesus’ light in many ways can be compared to the sun, which always shines. Often we put up “clouds” or go indoors to try to “hide” from the sun, because its light is too bright and the truth it brings too difficult to bear.

During Advent, let us try to open our heart to the light of Christ and let his healing rays penetrate our soul. We may not always like what we see, but it is the only path that leads to true restoration.

Read more: Preparing for the light of Christmas in the darkness of Advent

Read more: In Advent, why are we waiting for something that already happened?

Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.
Aleteia offers you this space to comment on articles. This space should always reflect Aleteia values.
[See Comment Policy]
Readers like you contribute to Aleteia's Mission.

Since our inception in 2012, Aleteia’s readership has grown rapidly worldwide. Our team is committed to a mission of providing articles that enrich, inspire and inform a Catholic life. That's why we want our articles to be freely accessible to everyone, but we need your help to do that. Quality journalism has a cost (more than selling ads on Aleteia can cover). That's why readers like you make a major difference by donating as little as $3 a month.