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Team of essential factory workers clock out after 28 days of live-in shifts

Braskem America in Delaware County, Pennsylvania
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These dedicated workers ensured the production of material used in masks and protective clothing.

Back in March, a group of Braskem factory workers in Pennsylvania made the decision to clock in to their workplace for nearly a month to make sure they could manufacture enough polypropylene; the necessary raw material in protective wear for medical professionals.

The team of 40-plus workers all decided to leave their families behind and make work their home base for a number of weeks so that they could work around the clock to produce the non-woven fiber that is used to make N95 masks, hospital gowns, and sanitary wipes. Divided into two teams, each group of workers carried out 12-hour shifts over the 28 days they were at work.

With just the TV and some drive-by visits from loved ones, the workers got on with the job at hand. As Joe Boyce, the operations shift supervisor, shared with WSAZ for CNN: “There’s been a glow in everyone’s eyes. We’re truly honored to be able to give back and support people we will never meet in some way.”

Having met the urgent demand, the workers could finally clock out and return home to their families last week. Yet Boyce is actually appreciative of the fact that this work isolation meant the workers didn’t have to consider social distancing or wearing masks — they’re certainly returning to a different way of life than they left behind in March.

Boyce generously shared: “All the first responders, all the people on the frontlines, we thank you for what you’ve done. That’s what makes our job easy to do.” The men and women involved in the fight against COVID-19 come in many different forms, and this dedicated team is another example of people offering to sacrifice their time and family life to help others.

 

 

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