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Discover the clever way this Canadian woman is up-cycling school buses

SCHOOL BUS GREENHOUSE
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Doni Rae Franklin is finding a way to ensure a good harvest while also saving money.

A Canadian woman and her family have come up with a perfect solution for re-purposing old school buses, and it’s benefiting both the environment and the pocketbook.

Doni Rae Franklin and her family have managed to upcycle two yellow buses into greenhouses: a longer one that is now stationary after the drive-train was removed, and a shorter bus that’s still mobile so the family can actually drive their fresh produce to market.

The roof on the longer bus replaced with polyethelene plastic is creating the ideal environment for growing crops and plants. In true upcycling style, the family put the tin roof from the longer bus to good use by making planters to grow crops in. The shorter bus, with its original roof still on, is great for keeping frost off growing crops.

Geplaatst door Doni Rae op Dinsdag 24 december 2019

“As I’ve been getting more and more into commercial gardening, I’ve realized that these greenhouses are the best way to achieve a reliable harvest, stopping things like frost and hail from taking a toll,” Franklin shared with Farm Show Magazine.

At a time when people have been re-thinking their lifestyles and thinking more about growing their own food, these buses could be the answer. Franklin stated that if she were asked to custom build any further buses then she’d charge around $8,000, which is about half the price of a standard greenhouse, with the added bonus of bringing a splash of color to your garden.

It is thanks to initiatives and the creativity of people like the Franklins that it’s possible for us to be better stewards of God’s creation. By taking the time to repurpose and make the most of what we have, we can surely do our bit in protecting the environment a little more. If you’re not a dab hand at farming — or turning vehicles into a moving farm! — simple acts like encouraging your children to recycle or avoid wasting food are always beneficial.

If you’d like to know more technical details about the project, just click on the Farm Show Magazine article here.

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