Aleteia logoAleteia logoAleteia
Saturday 13 August |
Saint of the Day: Bl. Michael McGivney
Aleteia logo
Lifestyle
separateurCreated with Sketch.

The world’s largest rosary is being built in Lebanon

This article is reserved for Aleteia Premium members
CHAPELET_LIBAN_1_HL.jpg

HL / ALETEIA

Chapelet géant du Liban

Hugues Lefèvre - published on 07/12/22

Lebanese Christians have been working on the enormous project to pray for peace and unity for Lebanon.

A handful of Lebanese Christians have been working on a huge project for the past 15 years: building the largest rosary in the world, in order to pray for peace and unity for Lebanon.

The idea was born during a pilgrimage to Medjugorje (Bosnia and Herzegovina) in 2006. The police mistook the name of one of the Lebanese members of the group and that man found himself in prison for several days. During his captivity, he began to pray, and the idea of building a large shrine to the Virgin Mary came to him. Taking a pen, he drew a sketch of this giant rosary with a shape imitating the contours of Lebanon.

Upon his release, the dental prosthetist began raising funds to launch his project, and in 2008, the groundbreaking ceremony took place. The size of the “beads” that form this rosary is exceptional: nearly 5 yards long and 3 wide. These 59 concrete chapels have tunnels through them so that pilgrims can pass through as they say the Hail Mary. A small community has already settled on the site and is praying the rosary there with some Christians from the surrounding area. But the project, supported by the Lebanese Maronite Church, is far from being finished. For the structure to be completed, the “beads” must still be decorated and a huge cross must be erected above a chapel where perpetual adoration will be offered. At night, the nearly 2,000-ft-long loop will be illuminated and be visible from the sky.

chapelet-liban.jpg
Giant rosary in Lebanon

A symbol of peace

This extraordinary work is going on while Lebanon is going through a very serious economic crisis. But for the Christians supporting the project, it’s important to see it through, first of all because the inspiration for this rosary was born in 2006, the year of the war between Israel and Lebanon. In this unstable region of the world—the site is about 19 miles from the border with Syria—the purpose of the shrine is to pray for the peace and unity of Lebanon.

Moreover, the land on which the shrine is built overlooks the northern Bekaa plain, where many Shiite Muslims now reside. “We see that the Virgin Mary attracts many Muslims,” explains Archbishop Hanna Rahme of the diocese of Baalbek-Deir El Ahmar, where the giant rosary is located. “It’s also a way to build a bridge between our communities; may this shrine become a space for dialogue thanks to the Virgin Mary,” he adds.

The following is reserved for Aleteia Premium members

Already a member?

Free! - Without any commitment
You can cancel anytime

Discover all of these benefits:

Aucun engagement : vous pouvez résilier à tout moment

1.

Unlimited access to all new Premium content from Aleteia

2.

Unlimited access to new Premium content from our partners: Our Sunday Visitor and the Dominican friars.

3.

Exclusive access to our prestigious international press review

4.

Limited advertising

5.

Exclusive access to publish comments

6.

Access to our network of hundreds of monasteries that will pray for your intentions

Support media that promotes Christian values
Support media that promotes Christian values
Tags:
LebanonRosary
Support Aleteia!

Enjoying your time on Aleteia?

Articles like these are sponsored free for every Catholic through the support of generous readers just like you.

Thanks to their partnership in our mission, we reach more than 20 million unique users per month!

Help us continue to bring the Gospel to people everywhere through uplifting and transformative Catholic news, stories, spirituality, and more.

Support Aleteia with a gift today!

jour1_V2.gif
Daily prayer
And today we celebrate...




Entrust your prayer intentions to our network of monasteries


Top 10
See More
Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.