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British Catholic schools asked to remove ‘mother’ and ‘father’ from admission forms

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Catholic schools will be asked to remove the terms “mother” and “father” from admissions forms, after a government ruling that the terms could be too restrictive.

The Catholic Education Service has said that it will be asking schools to comply with a “unified approach” under which admissions forms omit the words. However, bishops will have the final decision over whether to accept the request for schools in the diocese.

The Office of the Schools Adjudicator, which settles admissions disputes on behalf of the government, made the ruling after a complaint against a Catholic primary school.

A parent had objected that Holy Ghost Catholic primary school in Wandsworth, south-west London, had discriminated against “separated, step and gay parents” in its use of the terms.

Peter Goringe, one of the 12 schools adjudicators, upheld the complaint, saying: “In the absence of any clarification of the term ‘parent’, the use of the words ‘mother’ and ‘father’ might, as the objector suggests, be taken to imply that the school is restricting its definition.”

Many Catholic schools have already replaced the terms with “parent 1” and “parent 2”, according to the Sunday Times.

Read on.

Deacon Greg Kandra
Headlines and Homilies
Deacon Greg Kandra is a Roman Catholic deacon in the Diocese of Brooklyn, New York. For nearly three decades, he was a writer and producer for CBS News, where he contributed to a variety of programs and was honored with every major award in broadcasting. Deacon Greg now serves as Multimedia Editor for Catholic Near East Welfare Association (CNEWA.) He and his wife live in Forest Hills, New York.
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