Aleteia logoAleteia logo
Aleteia
Wednesday 20 October |
Saint of the Day: St. Paul of the Cross
Aleteia logo

‘Collar and titles provide clarity’

Deacon Greg Kandra - published on 03/31/17

Now for something different.

A Lutheran pastor, the Rev. Erik Parker, was not a fan of wearing a clerical collar or being called “Pastor.”

But now, he’s changed his mind:

There are reasons that the church has used titles and clerical collars to identify pastors, reasons that still hold water today. Here are some of them: 1 Pastors are Symbols Like many vocations and callings in our world, we become public symbols when ‘on the job.’ Like police officers or fire fighters who symbolize safety and protection, like doctors or nurses who symbolize caregiving, like teachers or professors who symbolize learning, pastors are symbols to the people that we work with. We are symbols of God’s and the Church’s public voice in community. When we speak we speak not has individuals but as representatives of someone or something other than ourselves. The symbol is visualized in the collar or other clerical attire. People can see the symbol in the uniform of pastors, just as safety is presented in firefighter’s gear, or healthcare is by hospital scrubs. The symbol is verbalized in the title. When people address pastors by the title “Pastor” the symbol and its existence are intentionally articulated, rather than unintentionally assumed. 2 Using titles and collars provides clarity Here is how pastors who wear collars and go by “Pastor” know that the two are important. When a funeral home, for example, calls me looking for a generic pastor for a funeral, they don’t tell the family that some guy named “Erik” will be doing the service. Rather by calling me “Pastor”, the nature of the relationship I will have with this grieving family is understood. When I show up in a collar, it is clear who I am. Imagine walking into an ER and everyone was dressed in street clothes, and some person in jeans and t-shirt asked what your symptoms were, and then told you that Jimmy would be with you in a minute? You would be confused wouldn’t you. Now imagine the same in a church. A person walks in looking for spiritual help, and a member says, let me get Erik to help you. Collar and titles provide clarity. 3 Privilege The varied ways in which we bear privilege is coming into our social awareness. And the option to decline the visual symbols and verbal cues of pastoring are a privilege, in particular a white and a male privilege. It takes a certain amount of privileged assurance to decline being called “Pastor” and to forego looking to still be confident that those you serve will assume and understand the full nature of the pastoral relationship. It takes privilege to assume that people won’t confuse your person with you vocation. And that is because whiteness and maleness are not characteristics about that might lead people to assume that one couldn’t be or wouldn’t be a pastor. Yet, it is often assumed that women who are pastors are not pastors, whether it is sales people looking for the pastor over the phone, or visitors new to the church, or staff at hospital questioning the legitimacy of a visit. The same goes for people of colour whom are often likely to be disbelieved that they are who they say are. Worst of all, is that when white men, like me, decline the title and clothing of pastors, we undermine our colleagues who are women and people of colour, because we send the unconscious message that it is our whiteness and maleness that allows us to be pastors. Yet, if we used titles and wore the garb, we would clarify that we are filling office of pastor by looking like clergy and being addressed as clergy. It would also help if we insisted that all of our colleagues, regardless of gender or race or orientation were addressed by their titles.

There’s much more, concluding:

Titles and clerical collars are symbols and tools for ministry which, I think, all clergy should consider.  The symbols we use, visual and verbal are important and they speak to nature of our call to serve in God’s Kindgom. So let’s all think about the symbols and cues that we use that help us to understand and do ministry… titles and collars included.

Read it all. 

Support Aleteia!

If you’re reading this article, it’s thanks to the generosity of people like you, who have made Aleteia possible.

Here are some numbers:

  • 20 million users around the world read Aleteia.org every month
  • Aleteia is published every day in seven languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, and Slovenian
  • Each month, readers view more than 50 million pages
  • Nearly 4 million people follow Aleteia on social media
  • Each month, we publish 2,450 articles and around 40 videos
  • We have 60 full time staff and approximately 400 collaborators (writers, translators, photographers, etc.)

As you can imagine, these numbers represent a lot of work. We need you.

Support Aleteia with as little as $1. It only takes a minute. Thank you!

Daily prayer
And today we celebrate...




Top 10
1
difficult people
Zoe Romanowsky
How to love people you don’t really like
2
saint teresa of Avila
Zelda Caldwell
Now there’s a computer font based on St. Teresa of Avila’s handwr...
3
AVENIDO BROTHERS
Agnès Pinard Legry
Three brothers ordained priests on the same day in the Philippine...
4
SQUID GAMES
Philip Kosloski
How the violence in ‘Squid Game’ can impact your soul
5
Philip Kosloski
A scientist describes the Miracle of the Sun at Fatima
6
JUAN ELIAS MEDINA
Kathleen N. Hattrup
A martyr’s last letter to his mother
7
Theresa Civantos Barber
How following Christ is like falling in love
See More