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Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone of San Francisco and Master of Ceremonies Canon Avis process into the Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception for the Mass of the Americas.
Benedict XVI Choir in the left choir loft performing the Mass of the Americas.
The attendees of the Mass of Americas were surrounded by the beauty of the basilica, the beauty of the liturgy and the beauty of the music -- an incredible experience for all who came.
As part of the Solemn Pontifical High Mass, the bishop is vested, mirroring the preparation of the paschal sacrifice of the lamb, in which the lamb is cared for and prepared right up to the moment of sacrifice.
About 70% of the attendees of the Mass were under 35 years old, a sign that a younger generation is seeking a beauty that can be found nowhere else.
Another aspect of the Extraordinary Form is that the Gospel is chanted.
Archbishop Cordileone delivers his homily on the importance of beauty as a means inspiring faith.
The altar is prepared for the Liturgy of the Eucharist, which the celebrant prays facing away from the congregation, symbolizing that the clergy and congregation are all facing towards Christ together.
The profound effects of the intense level of beauty in the liturgy was apparent in the the faces of all the congregation.
The moment of consecration.
Communion was distributed at the altar rail.
Among the congregation there were dozens of children, all experiencing this phenomenal liturgy, teaching them to see what true beauty is while in their early years.
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