Riese

Riese, in the northeast of Italy, was the birthplace of the future saint, Pope Pius X. The Italian saint was pontiff at the beginning of the 20th century. In honor of his papacy his townspeople renamed their town Riese Pio X. While the full name could be an option among the more daring, a simple Riese is a lovely option that is a different take on the more common name, Reese.

Fatima

A popular choice of name, especially for those from Portugal or North Africa. It is also the location where the Virgin Mary appeared to three young shepherd children -- Sts. Francisco and Jacinta Marto and their cousin Lucia. The name itself means "captivating" which is a lovely choice for any little girl.

Siena

A name hailing from the beautiful region of Tuscany in Italy. It was the birthplace of the St. Catherine who was born during a plague. She was the 25th child in the family, although not all the children survived infancy. She was a mystic who devoted herself to God, the needy, and her family, serving them all with great humility.

Magenta

If you like a little color in your life, then look to the hometown of St. Gianna Molla, Magenta in the north of Italy next to Milan. The mother, doctor, and devout Catholic refused an abortion when her own life was at risk from cancer. As a consequence, she died after the birth of her child.

Alexandria

Numerous saints come from this port city in Egypt, including St. Catherine, the early Christian martyr who is also one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers due to her powerful intercessions. As a devoted bride of Christ, Catherine was tortured and sentenced to death on a spiked wheel. Tradition says that she touched the wheel and it broke, so she was beheaded.

Sicily

There are a number of saints from the Italian island in the Mediterranean sea -- notably, St. Agatha, one of the seven women commemorated in the Canon of the Mass. The 3rd-century virgin martyr was tortured and eventually died in prison during the persecution of Decius. It's an interesting alternative to the more common "Cecily."

Verona

The 13th-century Italian Dominican friar St. Peter was known for his preaching skills. He was born in Verona, in the north east of Italy -- the town that also featured in two of Shakespeare's plays. Peter of Verona, sometimes known as Peter Martyr, received the fastest canonization in Church history when he became a saint 11 months after his assassination.