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Julie Esther: My little boy, at his First Communion, received under both species, looked the priest right in the eyes and exclaimed with fervor, "Jesus is really good!" Everybody in the assembly laughed.
Sophie: I had watched a little girl who said once to her mom during the Mass, while showing her the bandage on her knee, "Mom, I suffer! I suffer 'underpontiuspilate!'" -- thinking it was an expression that meant it hurt really bad!!!
Ette: My little cousin made everyone laugh at church by continuing to sing after the Gospel Alleluia … with her little 18-month-old girl version: "Ah, the noodles, ah!" The parish still remembers!
Marie: At the back of the church with my 3-year-old son, we were looking at a statue of Our Lady of Lourdes, with her hands together. "You see, it's Mary, Jesus' mother. And you know what she's doing?” I asked. He answered, “She's getting ready to dive!" (This was the summer when he was learning to swim …)
Maryllis: Going to join the priest at the lectern during the homily … and being carried in his arms until the end of the sermon …
Camille: At the back of the church, the priests and deacons were getting ready for the procession and our Blandine (2 years old) asked a deacon, "Why are you wear a maternity dress if you have no baby inside …" We laughed so hard during the procession.

Another time, Blandine walked up the central part of the church while holding her hands together very well in front of her. She peered down around the priest's feet at the time of being blessed. Her dad asked her why she had done that, and she answered, "I was looking to see if there were any crumbs of Jesus since the priest did not want to give me any bread."
Laetitia: Claire, age 3, one week after Easter, while looking at the giant crucifix: "But Mom, this is serious. We have to tell the priest that he forgot to take Jesus off the cross. He is risen! Do you think he didn't understand?"
Bene: (Told by a friend) A bell rang at the moment of consecration, and a little voice piped up in the silence: "It's Jesus [on the phone], he can't come!"
Armelle: "My 3-year-old son was absorbed in contemplation of the crucifix in the church. Then he turned to me and asked me in a worried voice: "Mom, is that the real Jesus?" I said it was not. And he continued, "So if it's fake, why does he look like he's in pain?"
Bene: My big sister – very, very young at the time — cried out very loud "Hello?" at the time of the consecration when she heard the bells … It sounded a lot like the telephone about 40 years ago …
Laetitia: A little cousin had said at the collection: “First we're bored, and then we have to pay!” And also pointing at the red candle shining above the tabernacle, she asked: "When will it be green so we can leave?
Nathalie:  I just thought of another (but not one of my children, none of them were born yet). This was in 2002 or 2003. The priest had a cell phone that he left on in the sacristy. During the homily, we heard it ringing from the sacristy. A child from the choir, probably about 12 years old, went and picked up, then brought the phone to the priest during the homily, saying, "Mister Priest, it's for you!!!"
Armelle: This memory wasn't during the Mass, but it made me laugh a lot. My daughter asked me why the apostles were so sad about Jesus' death on Good Friday. I answered that Jesus, whom they loved, was dead. "Yes, but Mom, he will rise again in 3 days. And 3 days is not long." I then told her that the apostles didn't know that. Her response? "It’s been 2,000 years, they could at least have figured it out by now." How I laughed!
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