Aleteia logoAleteia logo
Aleteia
Monday 25 January |
The Feast of the Conversion of Saint Paul
home iconNews
line break icon

Ferguson: What We Know, What We Don’t Know

AP

Mark Gordon - published on 11/25/14

A grand jury did its job. Will the American public accept its findings?

In spite of all the attention the shooting of Michael Brown and its aftermath has received, there are only a few things we know with certainty. We know that at around noon on August 9, 2014, there was a confrontation between Michael Brown, a black 18 year-old resident of Ferguson, MO, and Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson police officer.  We know that at some point and for some reason Wilson pulled his service weapon and shot Brown six times. And we know that Brown’s body lay in the street not far from his home for four-and-a-half hours while the police and medical examiner conducted their investigations.

We know that Brown had stolen cigars from a nearby convenience store just before the shooting. But we also know that the store’s staff claimed they never called the police over the cigars, which were not recovered. We do not know whether Officer Wilson had any notion that Brown was suspected of stealing them.

We don’t know what precipitated the confrontation that left Brown dead. According to reports, Wilson says that Brown charged him and reached inside the cruiser for his gun. Dorian Johnson, who was with Brown, says that Wilson pulled his cruiser up so aggressively close that when he opened the door it bounced off Brown and back at the officer, striking him. Yet another eyewitness claims that Brown gave Wilson the “bum’s rush,” punching him in the head through the vehicle window. But Johnson and other witnesses say that Wilson reached out and grabbed Brown from inside the vehicle and that Brown merely tried to pull his arm free.

What we do know is that the first shot was fired while Wilson was still in the cruiser and the two men were struggling. The bullet struck Brown and he moved away from the cruiser. We know that Wilson and Brown subsequently faced off in the street, but we don’t know whether Brown simply stood his ground or advanced on the officer. We know that Wilson fired five more shots at Brown and thereby “caused his death,” in the words of St. Louis County prosecutor Robert McCulloch.

We know that in the aftermath of the shooting the African-American community in Ferguson was outraged, not just by the shooting itself, but by the fact that Brown lay in the street for so long. But we also know that four and half hours is not an inordinate amount of time for a crime scene investigation and that the medical examiner, not the police, was in charge of removing the body.

We know that the population of Ferguson is two-thirds black, 94% of its police force is white, and that there has been a long history of tension between citizens and the police. We also know that the shooting of Michael Brown was only the latest in a string of well-publicized police killings of unarmed black men, including several over the summer.

On the other hand, we know that 93% of black murder victims are killed by fellow African-Americans, which means that although the problem of police brutality is serious, it is dwarfed by the problem of black on black crime. Of course, we also know that white men kill 84% of white murder victims, which contradicts white widespread fears of black predation.

We know that in the aftermath of the Michael Brown shooting, protests were peaceful until professional agitators descended on the community from out of town. We know that divisive figures like Al Sharpton and Attorney General Eric Holder gratuitously injected themselves into the situation, stoking their own egos at the cost of rising violence. We know that Michael Brown’s family begged for peace even as violence flared night after night.

We also know that the Ferguson police, flush with military-grade equipment and weapons given to them under the Defense Department’s “1033” program, reacted peevishly and often brutally toward citizens and journalists alike, which only exacerbated the situation. And we know that the Governor of Missouri finally relieved the too-eager Ferguson PD of crowd control in favor of the less martial, more police-like Missouri Highway Patrol.

  • 1
  • 2
Support Aleteia!

If you’re reading this article, it’s thanks to the generosity of people like you, who have made Aleteia possible.

Here are some numbers:

  • 20 million users around the world read Aleteia.org every month
  • Aleteia is published every day in eight languages: English, French, Arabic, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, and Slovenian
  • Each month, readers view more than 50 million pages
  • Nearly 4 million people follow Aleteia on social media
  • Each month, we publish 2,450 articles and around 40 videos
  • We have 60 full time staff and approximately 400 collaborators (writers, translators, photographers, etc.)

As you can imagine, these numbers represent a lot of work. We need you.

Support Aleteia with as little as $1. It only takes a minute. Thank you!

Daily prayer
And today we celebrate...




Top 10
1
LUXOR FILM FESTIVAL
Zoe Romanowsky
20-year-old filmmaker wins award for powerful 1-minute film about...
2
Philip Kosloski
When did Christians start praying the Hail Mary?
3
Philip Kosloski
What are the corporal works of mercy?
4
PHILIP RIVERS
Cerith Gardiner
Quarterback Philip Rivers' retirement announcement reflects his s...
5
DAD, HOW DO I?
Cerith Gardiner
Meet the dad who's teaching basic skills on YouTube for kids with...
6
CONSOLE
Philip Kosloski
What are the spiritual works of mercy?
7
Fr. Patrick Briscoe, OP
The 4 Ways to read Scripture every Catholic should know
See More
Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.