Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here
The world and your Catholic life, all in one place.
Subscribe to Aleteia's free newsletter!

Not Prepared to Donate?

Here are 5 ways you can still help Aleteia:

  1. Pray for our team and the success of our mission
  2. Talk about Aleteia in your parish
  3. Share Aleteia content with friends and family
  4. Turn off your ad blockers when you visit
  5. Subscribe to our free newsletter and read us daily
Thank you!
Team Aleteia

Subscribe

Aleteia

A recipe for POTUS’ ‘potica’

Shutterstock-Dani Vincek
"Potica", slovenian sweet roll
Share

When a traditional Slovenian treat becomes breaking news, why not pull out the baking pans yourself?

Were it not for the encounter between Pope Francis and Melania Trump during the visit of the President of the United States to the Vatican, most of us would probably have never heard of “potica,” a traditional Slovenian sweet, mostly eaten at Easter. If you haven’t yet heard of the “potica-pizza” incident, you can read all about it here.

In a nutshell: when meeting the First Lady, the pope asked (in Spanish): “What do you give him to eat … ‘potica’?” The translator relayed, “What do you give him to eat,” adding, “is it …”,  and Melania interjected, “Potica? Yes.” The name of the dessert sounds like po-tee-sa, which given Melania’s response, led commentators originally to understand that she misunderstood him to say “pizza.” In any case, it was a charming conversation.

Translation and pronunciation issues aside, there’s a recipe for potica (“orehova potica,” specifically) you can look for at the Slovene National Benefit Society website. This might have been the one both Pope Francis and the First Lady were referring to. Remember: it’s a recipe for potica, not pizza! However, if you don’t have the time to read through it, here’s a video you can learn from:

 

Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.
Aleteia offers you this space to comment on articles. This space should always reflect Aleteia values.
[See Comment Policy]
Readers like you contribute to Aleteia's Mission.

Since our inception in 2012, Aleteia’s readership has grown rapidly worldwide. Our team is committed to a mission of providing articles that enrich, inspire and inform a Catholic life. That's why we want our articles to be freely accessible to everyone, but we need your help to do that. Quality journalism has a cost (more than selling ads on Aleteia can cover). That's why readers like you make a major difference by donating as little as $3 a month.