Aleteia logoAleteia logo
Aleteia
Sunday 11 April |
Saint of the Day: St. Stanislaus of Krakow
home iconArt & Culture
line break icon

The mystery of icon-preserving bees

HONEYCOMBS, ICONS

Fair Use | Unknown

Jésus Christ

Jala Kebbe - published on 07/05/17

In Greece, a pious beekeeper has a habit of putting icons in his beehives. The icons bless the bees ... and the bees protect the icons.

For a decade, a beekeeper named Sidoros Ţiminis, living in the region of Kapandriti, near Athens, has kept a tradition: every spring, he slips icons of Christ, the Holy Virgin and different saints in his beehives, in order to bless his bees and his yearly honey production.


pimthida-cc

Read more:
In Search of Spiritual Guidance? Look to the Bees

And every year, the very same mysterious phenomenon occurs: bees make their honeycomb cells around the pious images, meticulously avoiding covering them. Could it simply be a phenomenon related to some effect in the painting itself, which might prevent bees from building their honeycombs on them? In any case, the work of these peculiar Greek bees remains interest-worthy.

Tags:
Church History
Support Aleteia!

If you’re reading this article, it’s thanks to the generosity of people like you, who have made Aleteia possible.

Here are some numbers:

  • 20 million users around the world read Aleteia.org every month
  • Aleteia is published every day in seven languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, and Slovenian
  • Each month, readers view more than 50 million pages
  • Nearly 4 million people follow Aleteia on social media
  • Each month, we publish 2,450 articles and around 40 videos
  • We have 60 full time staff and approximately 400 collaborators (writers, translators, photographers, etc.)

As you can imagine, these numbers represent a lot of work. We need you.

Support Aleteia with as little as $1. It only takes a minute. Thank you!

Daily prayer
And today we celebrate...




Top 10
See More
Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.