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What happens when shelter dogs listen to classical music

CLASSICAL MUSIC AND PETS
Stasia04 | Shutterstock
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Cellist Cheryl Wallace offers pups a little comfort as they wait for a new home.

If you’ve ever been to an animal shelter you’ll appreciate that it can be a little stressful for its tenants. Bereft of a loving family home, these animals lack security and affection. But thanks to musician Cheryl Wallace, pups in her local animal shelter are getting caressed with the dulcet tones of her cello.

After learning that classical music can calm animals, Wallace decided to try the theory out on the vulnerable animals, and the results have been … well, adorable. If you watch the video posted by ABC below you’ll see our furry friends doze off by the cellist’s sweet sounds — as she says, she’s stroking 20 dogs at a time with her playing.

The music calms the animals and brings down their stress levels — a big reason Wallace wants to encourage other musicians to use their talents for pups in need of love.

Dogs aren’t the only ones who benefit from listening to classical music. An article in Readers Digest lists the many benefits for humans, too. Notably, a study published in the Journal of Health Psychology demonstrated that a heart recovers more quickly from stress after listening to classical music thanks to its effect on reducing blood pressure.

There are other physical advantages to listening to classical music discovered in further studies in 2006 that show how it can effect pain levels, moods and disability. Other studies show the social advantages of classical music — a little piano concert at a senior’s home, for example, gives residents the opportunity to share their thoughts and connect with each other.

Interestingly, another study shows how listening to classical music can affect our emotional responses, making us open up and become more aware of others. By disclosing more about ourselves than usual, we become more vulnerable, which fosters healthier relationships.

So, whether you’re a musician, a music lover, or just want to learn more about classical music, why not try playing some in front of your pet, or even your children, and watch what happens.

 

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