Aleteia

COVID-19 : The unexpected virtue of waiting

WOMAN AT THE WINDOW,
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The world has been waiting for the peak, the fall in the numbers, and the end of lockdown, but what if this long wait turned into a transformative experience?

Strangely enough, waiting is not a virtue in itself. A dog patiently waiting to be fed is not more virtuous than a baby crying for its bottle. We have gotten into a habit of not making others wait, lest they should think the worst of us. But let’s acknowledge the possible benefits of waiting, whether or not they’ve been a result of our volition. The waiting process is a crucible, where virtues that transform and elevate us can be forged. 

A time to learn about faith and piety

Despite its monotony, the current wait has turned into something of a mystical experience, making us come face to face with the reality of our personal lives. It’s a revelation, helping us to see our potential inner wealth or pointing to problems that prevent us from becoming holier and happier.  

Time seems to have frozen as we wait; we are caught between two shores. We can see our future and our past. Having put our projects on hold, we’ve embraced our inner life to take a closer look at ourselves. Thanks to this experience, we are now able to reexamine our past objectives. This wait has the potential to free us from worldly preoccupations, exposing us to faith, prayer, and contemplation.  

Time to learn about hope, patience and charity

To take advantage of this wait, let’s remember that while we are inactive, there is still a transformative process taking place deep inside us. It’s normal for it to be accompanied by pain, fear, or defiance. But thanks to it, we will learn the meaning of true hope, how to better perceive and accept the unexpected.

Any waiting process is a gift, an opportunity given to us to grow in patience, kindness, and humility. Let us make something worthwhile with this time and learn how to be more forgiving and charitable. Let us praise the Lord, who never stops surprising us, who consoles and rescues us. 

Jeanne Larghero

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