Aleteia logoAleteia logo
Aleteia
Wednesday 25 November |
Saint Catherine of Alexandria
home iconArt & Culture
line break icon

Archaeologists discover 1,300-year-old church near Jesus’ Mount of Transfiguration

Israel Antiquities Authority

Alex Wiegmann, Israel Antiquities Authority

Zelda Caldwell - published on 07/30/20

Researchers believe the church was part of a monastery near the Lower Galilee village of Kfar Kama.

Archaeologists have unearthed a 1,300-year-old Byzantine church at the foot of Mount Tabor, which, according to the New Testament, is the site of Jesus’ Transfiguration.

The Israel Antiquities Authority, along with the Kinneret Academic College, conducted the excavation that led to the discovery of the church in the Lower Galilee village of Kfar Kama, reported The Algemeiner.


TRANSFIGURATION

Read more:
Transfiguration: The spiritual life in miniature

Lead archaeologist Nurit Feig said,“The church, measuring 12×36 [meters], includes a large courtyard, a narthex foyer and a central hall. Particular to this church is the existence of three apses (prayer niches), while most churches were characterized by a single apse,” according to the report.

Researchers believe that the church was part of a monastery that was built on the outskirts of the village.

Since the early Byzantine era, the site has been a sacred one for Christians, who believe it is the location of Jesus’ Transfiguration, described in scripture. In Mark, Matthew and Luke, Jesus takes Peter James, and John to a high mountain where he becomes bathed in radiant light, a sign of his glory.

According to the Times of Israel, pottery found at the site indicates that the church was builtin the 6th century, during a “building boom” of churches in Galilee.

During the excavation, archaeologists discovered colorful floor mosaics, in geometric patterns, with blue geometric red tiles.A saint’s reliquary was also unearthed, but researchers so far have not been able to determine which saint’s bones were contained in the small stone box found at the site.

The excavation is part of an archaeological research project on churches in the Holy Land and eastern Mediterranean, which is being funded by the Israel Science Foundation.

Tags:
Archaeology
Support Aleteia!

If you’re reading this article, it’s thanks to the generosity of people like you, who have made Aleteia possible.

Here are some numbers:

  • 20 million users around the world read Aleteia.org every month
  • Aleteia is published every day in eight languages: English, French, Arabic, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, and Slovenian
  • Each month, readers view more than 50 million pages
  • Nearly 4 million people follow Aleteia on social media
  • Each month, we publish 2,450 articles and around 40 videos
  • We have 60 full time staff and approximately 400 collaborators (writers, translators, photographers, etc.)

As you can imagine, these numbers represent a lot of work. We need you.

Support Aleteia with as little as $1. It only takes a minute. Thank you!

Daily prayer
And today we celebrate...




Top 10
LUXOR FILM FESTIVAL
Zoe Romanowsky
20-year-old filmmaker wins award for powerful...
Luz Ivonne Ream
What’s the secret of this couple’s 64 years o...
Giuseppe Moscati
Larry Peterson
A volcano, a plague, a war: This doctor-saint...
PADRE PIO
Philip Kosloski
Padre Pio's favorite prayer of petition
CHRIST THE KING
Edifa
Why do we say that "Christ is King"?
CHRISTMAS AD
Cerith Gardiner
This heartwarming TV ad focuses on what reall...
FATHER RANIERO CANTALAMESSA
Kathleen N. Hattrup
Pope's preacher won't become a bishop though ...
See More
Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.