Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here
Start your day in a beautiful way: Subscribe to Aleteia's daily newsletter here.
Sign me up!

Not Prepared to Donate?

Here are 5 ways you can still help Aleteia:

  1. Pray for our team and the success of our mission
  2. Talk about Aleteia in your parish
  3. Share Aleteia content with friends and family
  4. Turn off your ad blockers when you visit
  5. Subscribe to our free newsletter and read us daily
Thank you!
Team Aleteia

Subscribe

Aleteia

In case you didn’t know, the Vatican Library has been digitized and is online

THE SISTINE HALL OF THE VATICAN LIBRARY
Share

75,000 codices, 85,000 incunabula and more than a million books have gradually been uploaded to the site.

The Vatican Apostolic Library, better known simply as “VAT,” was officially established in 1475, although it is actually much older.

It was in 1451 when Pope Nicholas V, a renowned bibliophile himself, attempted to re-establish Rome as an academic center of global importance, building a relatively modest library of over 1,200 volumes, including his personal collection of Greek and Roman classics and a series of texts brought from Constantinople.

The Apostolic Vatican Library recently announced that it had completed the digitization of a manuscript of about 1600 years of age, which contains fragments of the epic text that was commissioned by the Emperor Augustus in the first century BC

Today, the Vatican Library treasures around 75,000 codices, 85000 incunabula (i.e., editions made between the invention of the printing press and the 16th century), for a grand total of more than a million books.

Now all these treasures are being displayed online, thanks to a painstaking scanning process. Little by little, though. You can search the library, available to anyone with internet access, and download its archives just by clicking here.

Newsletter
Get Aleteia delivered to your inbox. Subscribe here.
Aleteia offers you this space to comment on articles. This space should always reflect Aleteia values.
[See Comment Policy]
Readers like you contribute to Aleteia's Mission.

Since our inception in 2012, Aleteia’s readership has grown rapidly worldwide. Our team is committed to a mission of providing articles that enrich, inspire and inform a Catholic life. That's why we want our articles to be freely accessible to everyone, but we need your help to do that. Quality journalism has a cost (more than selling ads on Aleteia can cover). That's why readers like you make a major difference by donating as little as $3 a month.